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>> remembering mandela. south africans gather to mourn the loss of a man who changed the nation and inspire generations. nelson mandela has died at the age of 95. thank for joining us on "france ." people around the world are gathering to mourn the loss of nelson mandela. this friday everyone from heads of state to people on the street are remembering mandela, who was both inspirational and controversial. and ray brown looks back at the life of nelson mandela. born in the former trance state territory on july 18, 1918, nelson mandela was meant to become a tribal chief like his father. instead he became a lawyer and the first -- in the first lack legal practice in johannesburg. he joined the congress in 19 -- in -- in his practice, he was exposed to the inhumanity's of apartheid on a daily basis. he decided to fight back. opting for nonviolence as a strategy. he was first arrested in 1956 and prosecuted on treason charges, which were later dropped. nancyars later he married winnie.s when he -- >> there are many people who feel it is useless and futile for us to continue talking p
today, and it was no more harsh than what bill keller pointed out. you know, what mandela -- he was associatesed with people that did the same things to their people, you know, gadhafi, castro that was done to him. and i think that was one moral failing. >> molly, is there something -- a lesson for the people on the american left for coming out of syria? >> i think syria has been an incredible challenge for the american left. on one hand, we want to claim that we are champions of freedom, but on the other hand, we've been incredibly conflicted as to what to do. do you arm the resist anticipate resistance in syria? do you reject anything that has to do with the american military? the american left didn't know. >> esther, molly, michael, thanks a lot. that is "all in" for this evening. we'll be back on monday. good night. >>> soon after nelson mandela was released it from prison in 1990, he came on a tour to the united states to raise funds here, to raise further support here for the anti-apartheid cause, but also to say thank you to americans who had supported him and supported s
for nelson mandela. >> he passed on peacefully. >> near midnight in johannesb g johannesburg's president announced the death. world leaders joined forces. in america our first black president spoke of his shehero,e first black president. >> he no longer belongs to us, but by the ages. >> to his county he represented forgiveness. >> you have a limited type of to stay on earth. you must try to use that period for the purpose of transforming the country in what you desire it to be. a democratic nonracial, non-sexist country. that is a great task. >> hello, i'm antonio mora, welcome to a special edition of "consider this". the man known as madiba said courage was not the absence of deed. born to a royal tribal family naming him rolihlahla dalibhunga, which means trouble maker, he lived up to his name. after studying law he dedicated himself to apartheid. a system imposed on the black african. nelson mandela was arrested in sentenced to life in prison. he spent 28 years behind bars, mostly in a tiny cell on robin island near cape town. nelson mandela's brutal imprisonment led to tuberculosis
contribons will live on forever. we send our heart felt sympathy to president mandela's president and to the citizen of the nation me loved. >> allen has more on nelson mandela's life. >> he was a prisoner and a president. a violent revolutionary and a moderate reformer. he was the face of change in turbulent south africa. his smile and his strength, power weapons in the fight for racial many people don't see it, against the government that applied. was on these savage attacks. leave south africa away from decades of racial separation and minority, white rule, was born in manage fella grew up in a rural roadless area near born to tribal royalty, he was adopted and raised by a chiefton after his father's death when he was just nine. he was the first in his y to attend school, where a missionary teacher gave him the first name nelson. his political activism began in college. join as boycott to school. he moved to johann studies law, and joins the african national congress, a political party and resistence moving fighting the segregation that was so deeply divisive. that passed laws
and not by fierce. >> mandela was born 1918 in eastern cape pro-vince, south africa. one of 13 children. he would go on to become a lawyer after a rare education in a white supremacist nation that was explicitly ordered around the oppression and degradation of the black majority of its people. mandela co-founded the youth league of the african national progress dedicated to equal rights and overthrowing the system of apartheid, the racial segregation upon which the republic of south africa had been founded. for this activity, the government armed with a vast secret police branded mandela an enemy of the state. mandela was forced into hiding. in a stunning 1961 broadcast, his first televised interview, the 42-year-old activist spoke with itn's brian woodlake. >> i asked him what it was that the africans really wanted. >> the africans require, want the franchise on the basis of one man, one vote. >> do you see africans being able to develop in this country without the europeans being pushed out? >> we have made it very clear in our policy that south africa is a country of many races. that there's room
finnegan with the continuing coverage of the life and death of nelson mandela. south africans remember the man who lead them out of white-only rule. >>> i'm barbara in london, remembering mandela in europe. the statesman who touched a generation. [ gunfire ] >>> in other news, france s more troops to the central african republic a day after violence left more than a hundred people dead. a cash for work scheme is winning praise for cleanup after typhoon haiyan. >>> we begin this news hour then with the dae of nelson mandela. the president of south africa addressed the country to reveal details of theno carrierringrin0 [ technical difficulties ] >> and thank you for making south africa what it is today. nelson mandela inspired millions of people to reconcile and forgive. in the coming days they will honor his legacy and memory as they begin to prepare to say good-bye. >> so the state funeral as you said next sunday december 15th. south africa won't have seen a state occasion like it. and with so many world leaders flying in, it is likely to be a logistical nightmare. >> yes, it is. but t
that nelson mandela lived. a man who took history in his hands. and bent the arc of the moral universes towards justice. may god bless his memory, and keep him in peace. >> remarked on the passing of nelson mandela from the president of the united states. for those of us just joining us, we received word on the passing of the former president of south africa, nelson mandela at the age of 85. he had been ill for some time. he was in and out of the hospital most of the summer, suffering through lung problems so he wantedded with pneumonia. we received word from the family that mandela was still fighting that he was struggling. let's get to mike now. the president has often called nelson mandela a personal hero. he visited the nation in june. >> right. >> a personal hero, and an inspiration, and you heard the president recount this often told story. as a college student, he got involved in the antiapartheid movement. at that time, his first exposure, inspired to politics by nelson mandela, and the president said something else that he said before. and i think it really strike as
mandela was in his early 40s. he had joined the african national congress, the anc, way back in 1944. the anc and the other major organizations opposing apartheid in south africa had been organized as nonviolent movements, nonviolent resistance, and nonviolent organizing. but after sharpville, they decided that maybe that wasn't enough. after sharpville, they decided they would form a paramilitary wing, and nelson mandela was one of the anc leader who is went underground to help start it. they said they would target government buildings and strategic infrastructure and they would try to sabotage the state. after sharpville, the government of south africa started mass arrests of anc leaders and other activists. they banned the anc. they made it illegal to be a member of that group. nelson mandela was arrested for treason in 1961, he was acquitted and he was convicted of traveling illegally. they sentenced him to five years hard labor on south africa's version of alcatraz, which is robin island. while he was already serving that sentence, while he was already in prison, they put him on
neighborhoods, schools, and train. in his autobiography mandela reflected on his experience growing up under apartheid. an african child born in an africa only hospital taken in africaon only bus, living in africaon only area, ride africaon only bus, train and be stopped any time day or not and asked to produce a pass. his life with regulations that cripple his growth, dim his potential and stunt his life. this was the reality. against that backdrop, mandela would become the man who neerm si -- nearly single handedly changed the fate changing to multi-p dimensional. he was suspended for participation in a protest, by the early 1950st and '60s mandela had grown political in the leader of congress fighting apartheid. in 1961 he gave his first tv interview. >> the africans prior want franchise on the basis of one man one vote. we have made it very clear in our policy that south africa is a country of many. following numerous arrests for peaceful protests, anc's protest land mandela in prison for 27 years on charges of attempting to overthrow the government. the terms were notorious and
. at this moment in time, i thank you for your insights and your thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela, and these are pictures from johan news burg outside the house. nelson mandela, the u.n. secretary general, was he making a statement of the passing, just let me know. let me bring in my colleague morgan ratford. lived and talks -- i did not know this, in south africa. morgan, what are your thoughts in. >> there was in 2010, i was there as a full right and i taught at the university in turban. i was also living in johan news burg during the time of the world cup. offs friend of the mandela family, and as greg mentioned this is a very interesting time for this to be happening in south africa. as greg mentioned the anc is going through a very tumultuous period. and mandela was their symbol of hope. >> a lot to ask you, but i believe the secretary of united nations is talking about the passing of nelson mandela. >> aspirations of the united nations. he shows what is possible for our world, and we didn't within each one of us, if we believe, a three man work together for justice and human
of the greatest men of our time is dead tonight. nelson mandela passing away today at the age of 95. shortly after his death, south african president jacob zuma addressed the nation. >> fellow south africans, our beloved nelson mandela, the founding president of our democratic nation has departed. our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost a father. >> south africa and the world in mourning at this moment. world leaders expressing their condolences. president obama addressed us earlier this evening. >> he achieved more than could be expected of any man. and today he's gone home. and we've lost one of the most influential, courageous, and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against aparthe apartheid. i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided
there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guest, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa this week. nelson mandela will be laid to rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after
today. >>> good morning. i'm chris jansing. this morning we remember nelson mandela. in life he united south africa and the world and his legacy as a fighter for freedom will continue to resonate well after his death. icon, legend, hero. none of those words seem quite big enough to describe a man who changed the world. ♪ and yet in the streets of johannesburg, the crowds are celebratory. south africa planning ten days of mourning. mandela's body will lie in state with leaders from all over the world expected to pay respects. here in the united states, flags are flying at half staff. mandela had a huge impact on president obama inspiring him to public service. the two only met once in 2005 when president obama was then senator obama. >> i am one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, the first thing i ever did that involved an issue or policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. >> mandela spent 27 years behind bars for treason, for backing an anti-apartheid charter. he was finally released february 11, 1990.
>>> this sunday, nelson mandela. a special person whose world course changed world events. >> he was a president that embodied that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us there is true freedom in forgiveness. >> we'll look at mandela's life, his policy, and how he handled criticism. it's all part of his enduring legacy. my guests, tom brokaw, civil rights leader reverend jesse jackson. and harry smith talks to poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> and that's what he brought, was deliverance and ignorance. >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a day of prayer and reflection in south africa as the nation mourns its former president, nelson mandela. flags are also at half staff at the white house this morning. president obama and the first lady will be going to south africa on tuesday. and former presidents jimmy carter and bill clinton will also be going to south africa t
rest this week. charlene hunter-gault who worked for npr during nelson mandela's presidency, and from new york, special correspondent tom brokaw. here is tom back in 1990 interviewing nelson mandela after he was released from prison. it's a great photo. the reverend jesse jackson is here, one of the first people to greet mandela after he was released from prison. what a great day that was. we'll talk about it. and he wrote a book entitled "mandela's way." and charles ogletree who marched for mandela's freedom and subsequently met with him several times. welcome to all of you. it's a great privilege to have this conversation. i want to begin in south africa with charlene hunter-gault and have her set the scene with this national period of mourning and reflection and celebration. good morning, charlene. >> reporter: right now, david, it is pouring down rain, and in south africa rain is a sign of good for tutune, so maybe it is honor of mandela. up until this moment, people have been dancing in the streets, they've been singing songs, they've been recalling aspects of nelson ma
mandela, a special "meet the press" a special in-depth look at a world leader whose course and determination changed the course of world events. >> his journey from a prison to a president embodied the promise that human beings and countries can change for the better. >> his enduring power is that he showed us that there is true freedom and forgiveness. >> a look at mandela's life, his effect on u.s. politics and policy and how he handled controversy and criticism, all part of his enduring legacy. among my guests today, my colleague nbc news special correspondent tom brokaw, civil rights leader, the reverend jesse jackson and nbc news correspondent harry smith talks to author and poet maya angelou as she mourns a good friend. >> that's what he's brought, deliverance from ignorance. >> i'm david gregory. all of that ahead on "meet the press" from new york this morning, sunday, december 8th. . >> i'll have all that ahead on "meet the press," sunday, december 8. >>> the world's longest running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> and good sunday morning. it is a d
their own sort of memories of nelson mandela. we'll have more on this on "morning joe" which starts right now. ♪ ordinary love >> i build a society in which all both black and white can walk tall without any fear in their hearts. assured of their right to human dignity, a rainbow nation at peace with itself and the world. >> it would have been groundbreaking enough to become south africa's first black president, but nelson mandela was so much more. not only to his own country but to people the world over. the freedom fighter has died at the age of 95. madiba, as he was known, sacrificed 25 years of his life in prison so that his countrymen might be free from the bonds of apartheid. >> your tireless and heroic sacrifices have made it possible for me to be here today. i, therefore, place in the remaining years of my life in your hands. >> when he was released from prison he was greeted by a crowd black and white and his plight inspired a young college student who would change history himself. >> i'm one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very fir
'm fareed ka czzaczar ya comin you live from new york. we'll start today's show with nelson mandela and we will ask what happened to his legacy in africa and beyond? i have a great panel including one of mandela's close kf dants. >>> then the man who until this summer was president obama's top adviser on national security, tom donnelly, on the iran deal and on why he says the u.s. doesn't need to cut a deal with hamid karzai of afghanistan. >>> next, how to understand the booming american economy. i'll ask the man who presided over great growth and some critics charge also helped create many bubbles. former fed chair alan greenspan. and as we approach the first anniversary of the newtown massacre, what can the u.s. learn from other nations about gun policy? i'll take you to japan for a fascinating look at a nation that loves violent video games but has a gun death rate that is very different from america's. it's a preview of a "gps" special airing tonight at 7:00 p.m. eastern. >>> but first, here is my take. when nelson mandela was released from prison in 1990, i remember being struck by h
>> rose: welcome to the program, tonight we remember nelson mandela, who died in south africa at age 95, joining me the former mayor of new york, david dinkins, the former editor of time magazine who wrote a biography on nelson mandela, stengel and his long time friend, jerry inzerillo. >> it was his genetic endowment what he learned in that moment of time. the great walter zulu who was really his mentor once told me a lovely story when young nelson mandela who first came to johannesburg to study law walked into zulu ice real estate office in soweto we were just trying to become a mass movement and one day a mass leader walked into my office. >> rose: also part of this program, a conversation with nelson mandela which took place here on this program in 1993. >> and the lesson is that the method of the people, the method of political method to be used, part determined by the oppressor himself, if the oppres oppressos peaceful means, we will never result to violence. it is when the oppressor in addition to repressive policies uses violence that the oppress have had no alternati
mandela. his death this past thursday saddened people all over the world and remind us how much he accomplished against such daunting odds. martha teichner will be reporting our cover story. >> he was to post apartheid south africa what george washington was to us, the father of his nation. >> there is time for the healing of the wound has come. >> he bore no grudges in spite of spending 27 years in prison. he went in a revolutionary and came out a statesman who spent the rest of his life reconciling white and black in a country where the racial divide was a chasm. later this sunday morning, what made nelson mandela a great man. >> osgood: we will consider mandela's place among the greats of history. and then turn to the manner of centuries beneath the square, a symbol of the freemasons, just who the masons are and who, what they do are one of the mysteries mo rocca will investigate. >> it is the world's oldest fraternity known for its rituals symbols and secrecy. >> what would happen if i found out the secret handshake and i weren't a mason. >> nothing. >> would you have to kill m
mandela in just a moment. but there is some breaking news this morning on two fronts, afghanistan and iran. we want to go first to liz palmer who is just arrived in tehran. >> the first big milestone in the post geneva era of nuclear cooperation between iran and the west have been passed, bob. there is a highly controversial reactor outside of tehran which could in the end produce plutonium which could be used for a bomb. it's been off limits to the international agency inspectors, but today they were allowed access to the site. i should stress that this deal, this cooperative deal is not universally popular here in iran. the president gave a big speech at a university yesterday and he was heckled by hardliners who really feel as if his reformist government has sold out. he was also heckled by students who want more reforms, political and economic and they want them faster. which really underlines how he is going to have to tread a very clever, diplomatic path from here on in. >> schieffer: all right. liz palmer, this story is going to go on all week, we know you'll keep us posted as it u
praised mandela's commitment to humanism and justice. to benjamin netanyahu who called him one of the outstanding figures of our time, to iran's president, rouhani, who praised his belief in the freedom and equality of all humans. pretty much every leader in between. in the u.s. the same thing is happening. emotional eulogies have been pouring in from bill clinton to both presidents bush, from susan rice to condoleezza rice, everyone is celebrating the life and mourning the loss of mandela. even arguably the most conservative member of the united states' senate today, ted cruz, released a heartfelt statement saying mandela live live in history for defenders of liberty around the globe because of his epic fight against injustice, an entire nation is now fre. senator cruz also posted that statement to his facebook page, and that is where the illusion of the bipartisan universally accepted respect and regard for mandela and the movement evaporated. the comment thread that follows ted cruz's respectful eulogy is not pretty. it's just teeming with stuff like this. go home, ted, you'
let me explain what i mean; it is a serious point. mandela was receiving power at a stage when most of the struggle had already been won, and de klerk was having to persuade his own people to give power up before they had been defeated. this was a different situation the world had not seen such a situation before. to his credit, de klerk realised that he needed the legitimacy of the electorate of south africa, who were, quite wrongly but in practice, were all white at that time. he called the referendum and, by the sheer force of his leadership, persuaded more than 60% of white south africans to accept that the days apartheid were over. even then, it required mandela, and it is to his credit, to go through long months of negotiation, not always with the support of his colleagues in the anc, in order to deliver not just a transfer of power that offered the prospect of peace for all the people of south africa. mandela once notably said, "this is not about moving from white domination to black domination. there must be no domination of either community." he was an extraordinary man in
blazers, taking different approaches to change their industry and the world. nelson mandela certainly changing the world, the legacy he left the hide. plus, ted williams, known as " the kid" and "the splendid splinter" one of baseball's all-time greats. and the kid who may become the next warren buffett. all of that and more over the next hour. first, let's go to the headlines from our radio cohost carol massar. a five-&p 500 snapping day slide, gaining more than one percent, after better than expected u.s. jobs reports. dropped toyment rate a five-year low, payroll with 203,000 jobs added. sears is looking to spin off its lands end unit which has remained profitable despite the company struggles. and there was much glitz and glamour for today's world cup draw. rizzo will faced mexico, -- brazil will face mexico, cameroon, and portugal. those are some of the top headlines. massar. you, carol the world mourns the loss of one of its great leaders. nelson mandela emerged from 27 years in prison to become south africa's first elected black president, dying yesterday at the age of 95. the
at the marginalized as if they are somehow unhuman. we celebrated nelson mandela. pope francis talks about people who find themselves excluded without work or possibilities or any means of escape. i think it's an odd ideology saying the rich work harder when we throw money at them and the poor work harder when we throw less money at them. there's a disconnect there. >> i'm going to have to leave it there. thank you both for your time tonight. >> thanks, rev. >> good to be with you. >>> ahead, what republicans hope you forget about their views on nelson mandela. including the congressman who compared the great leader to willie horton. >>> plus my interview with the star of "mandela: long walk to freedom." idris elba is in the studio tonight. >>> also, want to know how the gop's outreach to women is going? just listen to rush limbaugh's advice on avoiding sexual harassment. >> you walk up to the woman and say, would you please ask your breasts to stop staring at my eyes. try that. might help. >> outrageous. >>> and which lucky republican is the latest to sign up for obama care? we'll unveil the happy w
. first understanding the impact and importance of president nelson mandela. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. we are going forward. our noorch freedom is irreversible. we must not allow fear to stand in our way. >> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. the world lost one of its greatest leaders and agents of social change with the passing of nelson mandela at the age of 95 on thursday. madiba, the clan name by which he was known, transcended the boundaries of south africa as it became synonymous with the country's greatest struggles and triumphs. mandela meant many things to many people, including president obama, who offered this tribute shortly after mandela's death. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. >> no one can deny the indelible contributions and sacrifices that nelson mandela made and for the people of south africa and ultimately the world. but often when a great leader passes on, what we think we k
to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. >> nelson mandela long walk to freedom took him right through the united states capitol. at the start of this saturday in december with much of the country locked in a deep freeze. we are thawing out this morning with questions ability some of the new things we've discovered. did you know as recently as five years ago, nelson mandela needed a special waiver just to travel in the united states. we're going to talk about why that was and why it took so long for that not to be the case anymore. there are also always things we know this week, from the wide ranging conversation with president obama, his frustration and disappointment with congress, hills hope in the young people, political leaders of the future. we will talk about that later. progressive leaders are pushing back, fighting back against voices that want them to give in on things like cutting social security and medicare. there is no mistaking that this week. finally, we want everyone to know our weekly current events quiz show "up against the clock," moving to the sec
to do the miracle story, you know? nelson mandela was the miracle leader of the exceptional place, the rainbow nation, etc., you know, we tell the story and sing "kumbaya", do a little dance. [laughter] one version. and the other version is it's all crap, right? it was all soiled and terrible trick that the nc played. and so i kind of figured i would get pegged as one or the other. rhea milan said i seemed to be immune to pessimism, and i actually take that as a point of ride. also not softheaded or softhearted about what i'm seeing. that's the kind of trip that i tried to make. so the reviews have been quite good. seems to be selling and sort of bracing for that first really brutal review. it hasn't happened yet. >> have you heard from zuma? >> i have heard indirectly from president zuma who gave me a lot of time, eight interviews, more time than anybody else has ever had from him. and i kind of expected, i don't know, actually, what i expected. he's still trying to absorb what he thinks of the portrait that's been drawn of him, is the best way to put it. >> and my final question
. >>> a crowd is going to stay for the official service for nelson mandela. johannesburg, area national day of prayer. members of all faith honored the former president. meanwhile a steady flow of mourners stopped by his home in suburban johannesburg. more now from al jazeera's nick schiff rin. >> nelson mandela always talked about a rainbow nation on behalf of all south africans who were segregated by racist rulers. nelson mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. at afternoon interfaith service searchesouth africans celebratee unity that nelson mandela provided them. down the road at an indian rally, perusha thanked him for the difference for her children. >> basically madiba made the change. we were basically part of the deprived lot. we had to use only the baths for indian people. >> her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we go out in the evening the buy something to eat and we have to say to the guy, sorry do you serve, and you're more than welcome to buy take aways. >> they have no idea what their parents suffered for them w
mandela's fight. >> what we can all do is to make sure that we fight for what mandela fought for. he fought against oppression. it was this against people. they have no reason to celebrate mandela. >> more on the national day of prayer on al jazeera nick sheeve written. >> new mexico new mexico talked about a rainbo nation. his struggle wasn't only on behalf of black south sfrinz but all south sfrinzafricans but all south africans? >> new mexico new mexico mandela wanted to build a nation united in diversity. today, citizens young and old, of all races religions say mandela created that unity. at an inter faith service, south africans celebrated opportunities and respect that mandela provided thed them. >> it allows us to be united and proud of. down the road at an indian rally, perussia thanked mandela on behalf of changes. she was a second class citizen. apartheid didn't only segregate blacks? >> we were part of the deprived lot. her husband suffered the same. he remembers being humiliated just for eating dinner. >> we used to go down in the evening to buy something to eat. and we
for a book of condolence for nelson mandela has been opened. one of the number across the country with many here saying it felt important to the passing of a remarkable person like this the market around the globe he said the last boss in a gift of hope and freedom for other people think every country to as the no name and craft itself is an fantastic achievement for one man and he's been through. it's tough for him. she's so stressed us he was among the one month time span had advancement that had died it was nice that he's a great band and dancers don't think it's a huge gulps. in the workforce as he leaves behind a wonderful legacy. this book of condolence has opened up the request of the south african ambassador. this will be open for three days here before moving to the ambassador's residence on monday the lord mayor of the city saying is give an opportunity to defeat the year to express their sense of loss following the death of nelson and tell us the sense of loss also being felt in cork limerick and goal weight were folks have been opened and here in belfast where they lined up to s
about his book "after mandela." he spoke with author and journalist alex kotlowitz for about 45 minutes. nelson mandela died on decembe december 5. >> thanks. this is a real treat to be here today with the. we are old friends. for those of you not familiar with his work, doug was formerly editor of "mother jones." doug and i are also colleagues at northwestern school of journalism. it's a thrill to be or to talk about his recent book, "after mandela" which i think is a beautifully written account of contemporary south africa. i think a profoundly important book. made we can talk some about the. i think it is profound import not on because it would help us understand what's taking place in south africa but i think it also, it has many lessons for us here in the u.s. as well as elsewhere. as countries emerge from years of tyrannical regime and they're trying to sort of find a way to some kind of democratic government, some kind of democratic system. thought that we would begin may be talking a little bit about mandela investment in use in the hospital now. i think it's fair to say that he
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)